Monday, May 10th, 2010...3:13 pm

Buy Viagra SERPs Revisited

Jump to Comments

Google’s updated interface has finally been rolled out across all the datacenters so I thought I’d check how it affected the “buy Viagra” SERPs.

“Everything” results are pretty traditional for this query – they are just regular search results. Highlights: #1 is a spammed .edu with a redirect. #2 and 3 are online pharmacies with 37,000 and 48,000 backlinks each, most of which seem to be comment spam. #4 is a bit more interesting – an online pharmacy with top backlinks coming from a network (akin to the one Paul Madden described) built circa 2006. Overall, the prescription for ranking in the top 10 for “buy viagra” seems to be owning an aged (at least a couple years old) domain and spamming a few thousand automated links to it.

“Updates” seem to be all from Twitter. I really like the timeline feature – it lets you discover interesting tendencies in the SERPs. For example, it let me see that the most buy viagra Twitter spam this year occured on March 25 – I wonder why?

In “Images” there is a mixture of actual Viagra images (from online pharmacies and such) and SERP screenshots – watching the “buy viagra” SERPs is getting more and more fashionable it seems (interpreting them correctly is quite another story – but let’s leave discussing the people trying their hand at it for some other time). I wonder if the above screenshot will end up ranking there as well at some point?

“Videos” – surprise surprise – only 1,010 results! Seems like an opportunity, no?

In “Maps” some people are having quite a lot of fun with all kinds of Maps spam – but these SERPs are more saturated than Videos, with over 6,000 results.

“News” – oooo looks like Viagra spammers do not know yet how to plug their stuff into Google News :-) Only 100 results at the moment.

In the “Blogs” SERPs there is more evidence of constantly updated parts of networks used for pushing the main sites up for Viagra queries

In “Discussions” there are a bucnh of spammed forums and question and answer sites such as Yahoo! Answers and Amazon’s Askville. My all time favorite one is a profile of  German speaking Viagra spammer in one of the forums with the user name of “Dr. Pfizer”.

Conclusion: Because so many alternative versions of the SERPs have become more available to the searchers it makes sense not to discount them any more. So, I predict that it’s only a matter of time until “buy viagra” SERPs in those alternative views becoem as competitive as the regular ones.